Drupal Planet

Moving towards a service oriented architecture

In this installment of our case study about working with long term projects I will explain the architectural decisions made by our client, ZEIT ONLINE, regarding the relaunch of their digital subscription platform. Please refer to part 1 of this series for basic information about the project and a discussion of how to deal with the evolution of programming languages and operating systems.

Working with long-term projects

For long-term projects one of the engineering challenges is to cope with technical evolution. The languages, libraries, and third party software like database engines and web servers we are using are under continuous development; new features are only added to the current development branches and security updates are only applied to currently supported releases. Using the example of one of our projects I will point out specific challenges and possible ways to deal with them in a series of posts.

Putting powerful platforms under cooperative control

On November 13th and 14th in New York City, several hundred people gathered to talk about the problems of an online economy reliant on monopoly, extraction, and surveillance—and discuss how to build a "cooperative Internet, built of platforms owned and governed by the people who rely on them."

Marking up Drupal's blog posts for the IndieWeb

IndieWebCamp is a movement dedicated to growing the independent web, or IndieWeb: a people-focused alternative to the corporate web. The movement is called IndieWebCamp because it is built in large part over an on-going series of two-day camps. At these camps and online, the community emphasizes principles over particular projects or software— any web site can be a part of the IndieWeb. Here's how to take a first step into the IndieWeb with Drupal.

Disposable Drupal installations with drush

Sometimes we need a Drupal installation for a quick test of a module, theme, or feature that we are working on. You can have a LAMP stack installed locally or, as we do at Agaric, use virtual machines. In both cases, it can take a considerable amount of time to make the required configuration to install Drupal. It is possible to avoid all that by leveraging Drupal’s support for SQLite and using PHP’s built in web server. Let me show you how to easily create a disposable installation with a few drush commands.